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KK's Home Remedies
Apr 13, 2021
In Ingredients on my shelf
Ingredients found on my shelf! content media
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KK's Home Remedies
Apr 13, 2021
Natural "Carrier" Oils on my shelf content media
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KK's Home Remedies
Apr 13, 2021
In Essential Oils
Essential Oils on my shelf! content media
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KK's Home Remedies
Apr 13, 2021
List of Herbs available at KK's Shop content media
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KK's Home Remedies
Mar 16, 2021
In ***News & Updates***
Come find me at: Makers Market Saturday May 1, 2021 10am - 2pm 201 Ogle Ave Knoxville, TN 37920 https://www.sfcknox.org/profile/kkhomeremedies/profile Visit my booth at the Makers Market Saturday May 1st. I will have a variety of organic products for sale. Skin Care, Animal Care, Physical Ailment remedies, Diffuser Blends, Bath Products and more! I will also have a full list of the organic dried herbs, organic essential oils and other natural ingredients I keep in stock and are available for customizing your products. I will also have a Play Center set up for the kids to enjoy. Some activities include; Inflatable bounce house, Arts & Crafts Tables, Bubble Machines & Wands, Free Prize Box, Music, Pop Up Tents and Crawl Through Tubes, Toddler Ball Pit, Ring Toss, and More! All of the play center items are disinfected before set up and again during Market Hours. Sanitation Station Baskets are available throughout my booth and play area. Each basket contains Free individually packaged face masks for both children and adults, individually packaged sanitizing hand wipes, a large pump bottle of hand sanitizer and sanitizing wipes for your electronics. Makers Market is a free event but donations are appreciated. Enjoy live music and make sure to check out all of the other amazing venders who have booths set up at the market.
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KK's Home Remedies
Feb 01, 2021
In Types of Candle Wax
What is Beeswax? Beeswax is the oldest known type of candle wax. It dates back to the Egyptians, who dipped papyrus leaves in the wax before burning them. However, it isn’t often used for scented candles as the wax has it’s own beautiful honey aroma that doesn’t easily mix with other scents. Beeswax candles are considered the healthiest as they are smokeless and sootless, and actually can help purify air. Beeswax is sourced naturally from bees; they create it by eating honey and make it as part of their daily hive building activities. Many scented candle makers who use beeswax in their creations will mix in another type of candle wax. Boy Smells use a mix of coconut and beeswax to make their candles. David Kien from Boy Smells said “We use coconut and beeswax over soy, because coconut actually lets the scent breathe better.  It is softer with a cleaner burn, and produces a better product. We then add Beeswax which helps firm up the natural soft texture of the coconut wax.” Types of Beeswax The most common type of beeswax color that can be easily found is yellow. This is actually the pure and natural tone of a honeycomb. In fact, the more golden the color, the more quality the wax is said to have. Those that have darker colors are the ones that are deemed as lower quality waxes. Yellow is really not a fixed color of beeswax; that is, the wax must not really present as yellow. It can be creamy golden, orangey and dark brownish tint. The colors or tints usually have something to do with the flowers where the bees are harvesting or foraging the materials they need for their hive. Uses of Beeswax Beeswax with yellow to golden color are said to be pure and of high quality. These are the type of wax that product makers prefer to use. Both yellow and white beeswax can be used for creating holistic products such as lip balms, lotions, soaps and candles. Beeswax has an indefinite shelf life and it’s usually added to bath and body recipes as a hardening agent. In cold process soap, beeswax is a natural way to harden your soaps and can be added up to 8% in recipes. Differences Between White and Yellow Beeswax Pellets Aside from the natural conditions that affect the color of the beeswax, the processing methods do also have an effect. You have to know that the honeycomb accumulates impurities in which the beekeepers who harvest them really need to filter them out. One of the most common processing method involved is by the use of heat where the beeswax are melted. Exposing the wax to a high temperature is often a result of a dark colored wax. We are going to attempt to isolate the differences between the yellow and white beeswax, and what occasion each should be used. 1. Filtration process One of the main differences between white and yellow beeswax pellets is actually their filtration process. Yellow beeswax have undergone heating procedure and then filtered to get rid of the debris. While for the white beeswax, it undergoes pressure-filtration which gives that white like ivory color. 2. Refined and bleached Yet another difference between the yellow and white beeswax is that the yellow beeswax is fully refined, while the white beeswax is naturally bleached by exposing it in thin layers to air, sunlight and moisture. The wax has been completely refined to the extent that the yellow tint got removed. 3. Uses Yellow and white beeswax differ also in their uses. Pure, unbleached, pressure-filtered beeswax is typically ivory in color. It features a sweet scent, and is ideal for those products where you desire a light tone. If you want to add colorants to your product, then white beeswax is highly recommended. Yellow beeswax has been heated and cleaned to filter out debris. It varies in color from light to dark yellow. This version of beeswax is ideal for candle-making and other products where you’d like the natural color of the stuff to come through. White beeswax is great for projects such as candle making because you can create lots of different colored candles with natural mica powder. Beeswax candles are naturally hypoallergenic and emit negative ions into the air, which have various health benefits. Yellow beeswax can still be used for candles, but will not showcase the colors in the mica powder as well as a white beeswax base will. White beeswax is typically chosen for aesthetic reasons. Yellow beeswax is also used in cosmetic applications like balms or salves but white for lipsticks or anything where a high percentage of beeswax is needed. 4. Purity Yet another difference between the yellow and white beeswax is that beeswax with yellow to golden color are of good purity and of high quality. Benefits of Beeswax Candles Beeswax is naturally made and processed Beeswax is healthy and helps purify air
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KK's Home Remedies
Feb 01, 2021
In Types of Candle Wax
What is Paraffin Wax? Before Soy and Coconut, there was Paraffin. Paraffin wax (also known as mineral wax) is still popular with many high street candle brands because it holds color and scent very well, and being a by-product of the oil industry means it’s easily available. Green-minded people often label paraffin wax as bad because it’s made from the leftovers of the crude oil refinement process. This doesn’t automatically make it toxic, and there’s always the upside that the parts of the oil that would otherwise be discarded are getting used. Benefits of Mineral Wax Candles Mineral wax holds a lot of scent, so if you prefer your candle to pack a scent punch it might be a good option.
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KK's Home Remedies
Feb 01, 2021
In Types of Candle Wax
What is Coconut Wax? Coconut wax is the new candle wax on the block and we are seeing more and more candle makers choosing it as an option. It’s definitely more expensive to use, but because of it’s great scent throw and even burn many think it’s worth the price tag. Coconut Wax is a soft creamy white color and is the eco-friendly choice. Harvesting the oil is an organic process with coconuts themselves being a sustainable high yield crop. Benefits of Coconut Wax Candles Coconut wax candles are slow burning and luxurious. The hot and cold scent throw of Coconut Candles is excellent Coconut wax gets the most eco-friendly points
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KK's Home Remedies
Feb 01, 2021
In Types of Candle Wax
What is Soy Wax? Often considered more environmentally friendly compared to traditional paraffin wax, burns slower and cleaner (less soot) and is cheaper than some of the other waxes. Soy wax candles generally have a subtler scent throw as soy wax doesn’t hold as much fragrance – many people prefer this softer scent, but it comes down to how delicate your nose is! Soy candles haven’t been around a long time, with soy wax only being invented back in 1996. Soy wax is a vegetable wax derived from soybean oil. To get to the oil, harvested soybeans are cleaned, dehulled, cracked, and rolled into flakes. The oil is then extracted from these flakes and hydrogenated, a process where the unsaturated fatty acids present in the oil are saturated. This alters the oil’s melting point, making it solidify at room temperature and ready for candle making. Environmentally speaking, while it’s a better choice compared to paraffin wax, it still has a few eco issues.  Soybean oil is a byproduct of the massive soybean industry and there are concerns over deforestation and the use of pesticides and fertilizers used to grow soy beans. What is Soy Wax Blend? Soy wax is often blended with other waxes to capitalize on the best of both waxes. Common mixes include adding other vegetable oils like coconut, and waxes like palm or beeswax. A number of candle makers also choose to use paraffin/soy blends. Generally, if the blend contains at least 51% soy it will be labelled as a soy wax blend. Benefits of Soy Wax Candles Soy wax is slow burning so you’ll get a longer lasting candle for your money compared to old school paraffin wax candles. Soy beans are natural, renewable and biodegradable. burns cleanly (less soot) without the worry of indoor air pollution
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KK's Home Remedies
Feb 01, 2021
In Types of Candle Wax
What is Wax? Broadly speaking wax is a flammable, carbon-containing solid that becomes liquid when heated above room temperature. In other words it’s the candle’s fuel. When the scented candle is lit, the wax melts, is vaporized and combusted, which in turn produces the heat and light. Almost any kind of oil can be turned into a wax, making plenty of choices for use in candles. What Is Candle Wax Made From? There are many different types of wax that can be used to produce scented candles. Beeswax has been used in the production of candles for thousands of years, whereas waxes made from coconut and petroleum are modern inventions. Each type of candle wax has different properties, making some better at holding and transmitting fragrance while others excel in burning slowly and producing a smoke-free flame. In the sections below you’ll find information on each of the types of candle wax. Which Candle Wax Is Best? Each type of candle wax has it’s positives and negatives making it hard to pick an all out winner. This is why there are so many different types of candle wax (and candle wax blends) on the market. In the sections below we discuss the benefits and disadvantages associated with each style of wax, allowing you to decide which wax is best for you. Which Candle Wax Burns The Longest? Soy wax is generally considered to have the longest burn time, however each year new improved candle wax formations are being created using new ingredients that allow for even slower burning candles. The length of time your candle burns for is greatly effected by things like where you burn the candle, the temperature of the room, the fragrance oils, wick and container the candle uses among many other factors making it hard to say exactly how long your candle will last. All the burn times on this website are approximations and only meant as a guide. Which Candle Wax Gives The Best Scent Throw? Currently Paraffin waxes are considered the best for achieving a strong fragrance – this is why many high street brands still use paraffin wax in their candles. While paraffin may have reigned supreme for the past decade or so, newer natural waxes such as soy, coconut and rapeseed wax are improving year on year and look set to gain this title in the near future. Is Candle Wax Toxic? Well, let’s first off just say don’t eat your new scented candles – they don’t taste as good as they smell! While many candles are made using non-toxic food-grade paraffin wax, an ingredient often found in the production of cosmetics and food, we don’t recommend taking the chance. There are certain waxes that do give off small amounts of chemicals when burning. Paraffin wax has been found to release some volatile organic compounds into the atmosphere when lit, and while these shouldn’t be a cause for concern there are plenty of other wax options for those who would prefer to avoid them. Natural waxes such as soy, rapeseed, coconut and beeswax are the best choice for those wanting candles that burn cleanly without the worry of indoor air pollution. There are even some reports that beeswax can actually help clarify air. We highly recommend seeking medical attention if you begin to feel unwell while burning candles or after accidentally ingesting wax – it may be that you are allergic to one or more of the ingredients used in the candle. Care should also be taken with pets – dogs and cats may find some of the ingredients in scented candles toxic and should be taken to the vet if they display symptoms after accidentally eating your candle collection. Sourced: Osmology
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KK's Home Remedies
Jan 28, 2021
In Chakras
Chakra (cakra in Sanskrit) means “wheel” and refers to energy points in your body. They are thought to be spinning disks of energy that should stay “open” and aligned, as they correspond to bundles of nerves, major organs, and areas of our energetic body that affect our emotional and physical well-being. Some say there are 114 different chakras, but there are seven main chakras that run along your spine. These are the chakras that most of us are referring to when we talk about them. Each of these seven main chakras has a corresponding number, name, color, specific area of the spine from the sacrum to the crown of the head, and health focus. 1. Root Chakra (Muladhara) The Muladhara, or root chakra, represents our foundation. On the human body, it sits at the base of the spine and gives us the feeling of being grounded. When the root chakra is open, we feel confident in our ability to withstand challenges and stand on our own two feet. When it's blocked, we feel threatened, as if we're standing on unstable ground. Location: Base of spine, in tailbone area What it controls: Survival issues such as financial independence, money, and food Mantra: "I can't grow from an unsteady foundation." Color: Red Element: Earth Stone: Hematite Yoga pose: Warrior I When it develops: 1-7 years old 2. Sacral Chakra (Swadhisthana) The Swadhisthana, or sacral chakra, helps inform how we relate to our emotions and the emotions of others. It also governs creativity and sexual energy. Those with a blocked sacral chakra could feel a lack of control in their lives. Location: Lower abdomen, about 2 inches below the navel What it controls: Your sense of abundance, well-being, pleasure, and sexuality Mantra: "I always honor others but not before myself." Color: Orange Element: Water Stone: Tiger's Eye Yoga pose: Bound Angle Pose When it develops: 8-14 years old 3. Solar Plexus Chakra (Manipura) The third chakra, the solar plexus chakra, speaks to your ability to be confident and in control of your life. Think back to the last time you had butterflies or felt a pit in the stomach: That's the Manipura chakra at work. If your solar plexus chakra is blocked, you might feel overwhelming amounts of shame and self-doubt. Those with open sacral chakras are free to express their true selves. Location: Upper abdomen in the stomach area What it controls: Self-worth, self-confidence, and self-esteem Mantra: "Self-love starts when I accept all parts of myself." Color: Yellow Element: Fire Stone: Amber Yoga pose: Boat Pose When it develops: 15-21 years old 4. Heart Chakra (Anahata) The Anahata, or heart chakra, is the bridge between the lower chakras (associated with materiality) and the upper chakras (associated with spirituality). As the name suggests, this chakra can influence our ability to give and receive love—from others and ourselves. Someone with a blocked heart chakra will have difficulty fully opening up to the people in their life. If someone's heart is open, they can experience deep compassion and empathy. Location: Center of chest, just above the heart What it controls: Love, joy, and inner peace Mantra: "When I love myself, loving others comes easily." Color: Green Element: Air Stone: Rose Quartz Yoga pose: Camel Pose When it develops: 21-28 years old 5. Throat Chakra (Vishuddha) The Vishuddha, or throat chakra, gives voice to the heart chakra and controls our ability to communicate our personal power. When it's functioning at full capacity, it allows us to express ourselves truly and clearly. Someone with a blocked throat chakra will feel like they have trouble finding the words to say how they truly feel. Location: Throat What it controls: Communication, self-expression, and truth Mantra: "I speak my truth, always." Color: Light Blue/Turquoise Element: Sound/Music Stone: Aquamarine Yoga pose: Fish Pose When it develops: 29-35 years old 6. Third-Eye Chakra (Ajna) As we move up the body, we're getting closer to communion with the divine. The Anja, or third-eye chakra, controls our ability to see the big picture and connect to intuition. Think of it as the eye of the soul: It registers information beyond the surface level. Visions and intuitive hits are not uncommon for someone with an open third-eye chakra. Location: Forehead between the eyes (also called the Brow Chakra) What it controls: Intuition, imagination, and wisdom Mantra: "I am open to exploring what cannot be seen." Color: Dark Blue/Purple Element: Light Stone: Amethyst Yoga pose: Child's Pose When it develops: 36-42 years old 7. Crown Chakra (Sahasrara) The Sahasrara, or crown chakra, the highest chakra, sits at the crown of the head and represents our ability to be fully connected spiritually. When you fully open your crown chakra—something very few people ever do!—you're able to access a higher consciousness. Location: The very top of the head What it controls: Inner and outer beauty, spiritual connection Lesson: "I am a vessel for love and light." Color: Violet/White Element: Divine Consciousness Stone: Clear quartz Yoga pose: Headstand When it develops: 43-49 years old
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KK's Home Remedies
Jan 27, 2021
In Carrier Oils
What are carrier oils? Carrier oils and essential oils are made from plants. Carrier oils are used to dilute essential oils and “carry” them to your skin. That’s because essential oils are potent and can cause irritation when applied directly to your skin. Most carrier oils are unscented or lightly scented and don’t interfere with an essential oil’s therapeutic properties. They may be used alone or with other oils to nourish your skin. Rating Scale 5 – Very Slow Absorption Rate Feels heavy and leaves an oily protective barrier on the skin. 4 – Slow Absorption Rate May feel sticky or waxy before warming at body temperature. Leaves a slight oily residue on the skin. 3 – Average Absorption Rate Leaves a slight oily or satiny finish. 2 – Fast Absorption Rate Feels light and absorbs into the skin readily. Leaves a silky smooth finish. 1 – Very Fast Absorption Rate Considered a “drying oil” quickly absorbed by the skin and does not leave an oily feel. Oil name Obtained from Properties/Uses 3-Almond Sweet Kernel of Prunus dulcis High in vitamin E and other fat-soluble vitamins. A light oil, protective and nourishing without being too greasy. Good for all skin types, including baby care. 2-Apricot Kernel Kernel of fruit from Prunus armeniaca Similar feel and use as almond oil, slightly more expensive. Light, non-greasy. Good for all skin types, especially prematurely aged, dry, and or inflamed skin. Astringent and toning. Arnica Infused with flowers of Arnica Mainly used as a counter-irritant to increase montana or other Arnica spp Helpful in circulation to a localized area. cases of bruising, inflamed and painful joints, and sore muscles. Avoid use on broken skin. 3-Argan Kernel of fruit from Argania spinosa Very high in vitamin E. Used for its rejuvenate, protective, and nourishing effects on the skin. Thought to prevent wrinkles and signs of aging. Toning and slightly astringent, useful for acne. Increases oxygenation to the skin cells. Good for rashes, infections, and bug bites. Also used for hair and scalp conditioning. 4-Avocado Dried flesh of the avocado pear Fortifying and regenerating. One of the heavier Persea Americana fixed oils, but more readily absorbed than olive oil. Indicated for extremely dry, cracked skin, dehydrated skin, wrinkles, and premature aging caused by sun damage. High levels of vitamin E. Also used for hair and scalp conditioning. Calendula Infused with flowers of A very versatile infused oil. Anti-inflammatory, Calendula officinalis astringent, and healing. Effective on wounds, rashes, abrasions, eczema, psoriasis, fungal infections and acne. Its effects are thought to be enhanced by the addition of other base oils. 5-Castor Seeds of the castor oil plant Some contraindications to its use including Ricinus communis pregnancy. Anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant. Specific external use for gastrointestinal cramping, constipation, and heavy congested painful periods. Also used for ringworm and for external relief of arthritis. 4-Coconut From coconut oil, long-chain Liquid form. Increased antioxidant and disinfectant (Fractionated) triglycerides removed. properties due to higher levels of capric acid and caprylic acid. Widely used in the preparation of soaps, lotions, and cosmetics. Also used for hair and scalp conditioning. 2-Grapeseed Hot extraction from seeds Produced by hot extraction, so not necessarily as of Vitis vinfera high-quality as others listed. Benefits are its astringent, toning, and emollient nature and non- greasy feel. It has good extractive properties, making it useful for infused/macerated oils. 3-Hemp Pressed seeds of Cannabis sativa One of the more heavy oils, but generally considered a non-clogging oil that helps to reduce the size of pores, clear blackheads and acne, and protect the skin from free radicals. It is anti- inflammatory and helps reduce redness in inflammatory skin conditions like psoriasis and eczema. Considered toning and astringent. Also used for hair and scalp conditioning. 3-Jojoba Bean of Simmondsia chinensis More of a liquid wax than an oil. Famous for its resemblance to sebum and specifically indicated in acne due to its regulating effects. Highly penetrative like hazelnut. Also useful anti- inflammatory conditions and sunburn. Thought to generally aid in skin elasticity. 5-Neem Pressed from nuts of Azadirachta Solid to almost solid at room temperature, often indica sold slightly diluted. Used in creams, lotions, and dental products as an anti-infective. Antifungal. It is also used to deter mosquitoes, fleas, flies, ticks, and mites. Used in the treatment of lice. Very strong scented. 3-Olive Pressed from the fruit of Olea One of the most common and easy-to-find carrier europaea oils. Heavy and greasier when used alone. High in fat-soluble vitamins, helps in the repair and rejuvenation of damaged, dry skin. Soothing to inflammatory skin conditions. Slightly antifungal and useful in cradle cap. Also used for hair and scalp conditioning. 1-Rosehip Seeds of the fruit of Rosa canina A very expensive fixed oil with glorious anti-aging and other Rosa spp. usually by properties. Very high levels of vitamin C and other solvent extraction free-radical scavengers. Specific for reducing scar tissue and damaged caused to skin from sun exposure. Tissue regenerator. 2-Safflower Pressed from seed of Carthamus Very high levels of polyunsaturated fats (90%) and tinctorius therefore less stable than other carrier oils. Used on inflamed joints and sprains. Shea extracted from the nut of the African Most commonly used like coconut oil in making of shea tree Vitellaria paradoxa creams, lotions, and ointments. Traditionally used to protect the skin from the sun (SPF 6) and repair damaged skin. Also used for scalp and hair conditioning. Often sold having been bleached and deodorized. 2-Sunflower Pressed from the seeds of Very common and easily obtainable with light Helianthus annus texture and non-greasy feel. Reliable oil that can be used on a variety of skin types. Great base oil for any mix or preparation.
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KK's Home Remedies
Jan 20, 2021
In Essential Oils
The 6 Best Essential Oils for Acne There are countless essential oils out there, all with their own unique benefits, but if you are looking for the best essential oils for acne, these are the top six. They all fight acne in more than one way, and they all have at least preliminary research confirming their ability to help improve your skin. Tea tree oil Lavender oil Eucalyptus oil Frankincense oil Peppermint oil Oregano oil 1. Tea Tree Oil: The Best Oil for Acne Prone Skin Tea tree oil is arguably the best oil for acne prone skin. It fights acne on all three levels: it kills bacteria, it reduces inflammation, and some studies suggest it can reduce how much extra oil the body produces. The first reason tea tree oil is often used to treat acne is because it can kill p. acnes, even at very low concentrations. Some tea tree oil products contain 10% tea tree oil, but studies show that after 5%, there’s no significant difference in results based on concentration, and many studies show that all you need is 3% to kill p. acnes. The lower the concentration, the lower the chances of irritation and inflammation, so this is a good thing. The second reason more and more people are using tea tree oil for acne is because it can help reduce inflammation. It’s always good to use products that decrease inflammation, but this can come in especially handy when treating cystic acne. Cysts form when bacteria get trapped in a pore, multiply, and expand downward into the skin rather than up toward the surface. This is often due to excessive inflammation, so with tea tree oil’s ability to both kill bacteria and fight inflammation, it is an ideal treatment for cystic acne. The last reason tea tree oil is so popular is because it may be able to help with hormonal acne. Hormonal acne turns up whenever our hormones fluctuate because increases in testosterone lead to increased oil production. Some studies show that tea tree oil can help suppress testosterone creation, and thus oil creation, but it may also produce more feminine features, such as less hair growth and enlarged breast tissue. 2. Use Lavender Oil for Acne Caused by Stress If you notice increased blemishes when you get stressed, you may want to try lavender oil for acne. Even though all acne is formed through the same general factors of oil production, inflammation, and bacteria, those factors can be triggered in different ways. Researchers believe stress is a common trigger for acne formation, and lavender oil may be able to help. Lavender oil for acne is effective in two main ways, one that helps with stress acne specifically and one that is common in most essential oils. First, let’s explore how stress acne forms and what lavender oil can do about it. Unfortunately, our bodies don’t distinguish very well between physical stressors, like a face-off with a lion, and emotional stressors, like a big presentation at work or school. It reacts the same way in both scenarios: fight, flight, or freeze. No matter which response you tend to have, your body releases large amounts of stress hormones like adrenaline and cortisol. In the moment, cortisol can help reduce inflammation, which should be good for acne, but if you have chronic stress, the opposite is often true. When we’re always stressed out, our bodies release a lot of cortisol which eventually starts to cause inflammation rather than prevent it. So where does lavender come in? Unlike tea tree oil, which is diluted with a carrier oil and then applied directly to the skin, lavender oil can reduce stress acne through aromatherapy. Lavender oil aromatherapy doesn’t directly reduce acne, but studies show it has a significant impact on stress reduction, which can lower cortisol levels, reduce inflammation, and prevent stress acne. 3. Fight Painful Pimples with Eucalyptus Oil for Acne Studies show that eucalyptus oil for acne can be helpful in three main ways: it kills p. acnes bacteria, it reduces inflammation, and it relieves pain. If you primarily have pimples or cysts rather than blackheads or whiteheads, eucalyptus oil is a great option for reducing your acne. Much like tea tree oil, eucalyptus oil has been carefully researched more than most essential oils, and the results indicate that eucalyptus oil could be a great solution for acne. Several studies have found that it is antibacterial, which sounds great but you should always check to see if the research addresses p. acnes specifically. Most antibacterial substances don’t kill every kind of bacteria, so it’s important to know what it can and cannot treat. Luckily, eucalyptus oil does kill p. acnes, and one study even found that a mixture of 2% eucalyptus oil and 4% guava oil was just as effective in killing p. acnes as 5% benzoyl peroxide (a common lab-made acne treatment). Its antibacterial properties alone would make eucalyptus oil a great essential oil for acne, especially pimples and cysts, but it also has anti-inflammatory and analgesic qualities that can help as well. Analgesic substances can reduce pain, and if you’ve ever had a particularly large pimple or cyst, you know that pain relief is a seriously underrated aspect of acne treatment. Studies in mice and rats show that eucalyptus oil can help reduce pain, and the same study also demonstrated eucalyptus oil’s anti-inflammatory properties. Together, these properties make eucalyptus oil a particularly good treatment for pimples and cystic acne. 4.Frankincense Acne Solution No, nothing can “cure” acne, but some products are definitely better than others at treating it, and the frankincense acne solution is unique in its ability to prevent and reduce acne scars. One of the most frustrating parts of acne is the scarring it can leave behind. Even once you have clear skin, you don’t really have clear skin until all the dark spots and scars are gone too. Oils in general are typically good for scar reduction, but frankincense can be especially effective because it can both prevent and treat acne scars. Acne is technically a very minor wound, and one of frankincense oil’s great properties is that it helps speed up the healing process. The quicker a wound heals, the less likely it is to leave behind a scar, so applying frankincense to your acne could help prevent acne scarring in the first place. Still, sometimes scars will form anyway, but frankincense can help with that as well. Scars slowly become less noticeable over time as our skin cells regenerate and the scar tissue cells are replaced with new, healthy cells. Frankincense simply speeds up this process by encouraging skin cell regeneration. If scarring is even more of a problem for you than acne itself, frankincense is definitely the way to go. Some sources claim frankincense oil can kill p. acnes bacteria, but in reality it is much more effective against other kinds of bacteria and is unlikely to show much of a significant difference in p. acnes in particular. The good thing about essential oils, though, is that you can mix and match. You don’t need to find one oil that can do everything, you can add some frankincense for your scars and let other oils do the work in getting rid of acne-causing bacteria. 5. Peppermint Oil for Acne We are relatively confident when we say that peppermint oil for acne can help in one of the same ways eucalyptus oil can: peppermint is also a natural analgesic, and it can help relieve the pain of especially inflamed or painful pimples and cysts. Peppermint oil contains menthol, which has been proven to provide significant pain relief, so if nothing else, you can definitely use peppermint oil for acne that’s causing you discomfort. Now onto the more uncertain aspects of peppermint oil for acne. Some sources claim that peppermint oil is antibacterial, and there is substantial research to support that, but very few studies test whether or not peppermint oil can kill p. acnes bacteria specifically. Other sources claim that peppermint oil may be able to suppress testosterone production, like tea tree oil, but we could not locate any studies that support those claims. Peppermint oil may not be the most effective essential oil in treating acne, but it’s still near the top, and we argue it takes the number one spot for best fragrance. 6. What We Do and Don’t Know About Oregano Oil for Acne Like peppermint oil, oregano oil for acne is still a bit of a mystery. There are plenty of rumors about what oregano oil can do for acne, from reducing inflammation to killing bacteria, to exfoliating the skin. It looks like oregano is in the same boat as peppermint when it comes to killing p. acnes bacteria. Some studies have found it to be antibacterial, but there is little to no evidence that it can kill p. acnes specifically. There is more evidence to support its anti-inflammatory properties. We are much more confident in the claim that oregano oil for acne could work because of its ability to exfoliate the skin. If you’ve tried lab-made acne products, you’ve almost definitely heard of salicylic acid. It is a compound typically used to treat blackheads and whiteheads because it can remove them by exfoliating the skin and clearing away the excess oil and dead skin cells clogging the pores. Salicylic acid was originally derived from the meadowsweet plant, but studies have found that oregano, along with other herbs and spices, can also be used as a source of salicylic acid. In its concentrated essential oil form, it is very likely that oregano is also capable of exfoliating the skin and reducing blackheads and whiteheads.
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KK's Home Remedies
Jan 10, 2021
In Essential Oils
Have you heard of aromatherapy? What is your go to essential oils? Inhaling the aromas from essential oils can stimulate areas of your limbic system, which is a part of your brain that plays a role in emotions, behaviors, sense of smell, and long-term memory Interestingly, the limbic system is heavily involved in forming memories. This can partly explain why familiar smells can trigger memories or emotions. The limbic system also plays a role in controlling several unconscious physiological functions, such as breathing, heart rate, and blood pressure. As such, some people claim that essential oils can exert a physical effect on your body. What are your personal experiences with essential oil aromatherapy? Do you have any advice or tips to offer?
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KK's Home Remedies
Dec 27, 2020
In Essential Oils
Did you know that Lavender Essential Oil has antiseptic and anti-inflammatory properties? Lavender Oil is also used for stress, depression and anxiety.
What is your favorite use for Lavender Essential Oil? content media
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KK's Home Remedies
Dec 27, 2020
In Cleaning Tips
We all hate that 'bad taste' our coffee pot can leave in our freshly brewed cup of coffee. When it comes time to clean out our coffee makers, don't bother buying those name brand chemical cleaners. You have everything you need right at home for a safe and natural alternative coffee machine cleaner! Here are three natural alternatives to use when it comes time to clean out that coffee machine and coffee pot: #1 Vinegar You will need equal parts white vinegar and water. Before you get started, place a clean filter in the basket. Now, pour your vinegar and water mixture in the reservoir and start the brewing process. Halfway through the brew, shut the coffee machine off and allow the mixture 30 minutes to really work on those tough stains. After the 30 minutes are up, go ahead and finish brewing the last of the vinegar mixture. Let that last half of the mixture cool before pouring it out. Clean out your coffee pot with a little soap and warm water before filling it up with fresh water. Add this fresh water into your coffee maker and run a full brew cycle. All Done! Vinegar is a great alternative cleaner because it cuts through dirt easy and kills up to 99% of germs! This very handy alternative cleaner is safe and usually always found in your home. #2 Baking Soda Baking soda is a wonderful natural cleaning agent and known for eliminating some of the strongest odors thrown its way. Fill your Coffee Pot up with very warm water and half a cup of baking soda. Make sure you mix the baking soda into the water until it is fully dissolved making sure we avoid any clumps clogging your coffee machine. Now, run your mixture through your machine on brew cycle. Run a clean pot of water on brew after your mixture has finished. Your baking soda water can be left to soak your coffee pot for 30 minutes before using a rag or sponge to clean the inside and outside of your coffee pot and coffee maker. Baking Soda is a natural abrasive cleaner and is great at scrubbing away stains and buildup in your coffee pot and machine. #3 Lemon Juice Lemons are as natural as they come and they smell great! Lemons have an acidity almost equal to that of vinegar. When it comes to cleaning, Lemon juice is prefered to vinegar because of the stout smell vinegar has and can leave behind. Fill your coffee pot with two-third lemon juice and the rest with water. After the brew cycle of lemon juice mixture has finished, run a cycle of fresh water through your coffee machine.
Natural at home cleaning tip: Coffee Pots content media
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